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Bone Marrow Stem Cell Harvest

By: Ian Murnaghan BSc (hons), MSc - Updated: 13 May 2015 | comments*Discuss
 
Stem Cells Cancer Leukaemia Bone Marrow

A bone marrow stem cell transplant uses stem cells derived from bone marrow to provide a fresh and healthy source of new blood cells which in turn, allows for a patient to receive higher doses of chemotherapy to treat certain types of cancer such as leukaemia. This ultimately means that a person has a better chance of surviving cancer. The bone marrow stem cells may be allogeneic and therefore donated by a family member of stranger, or they may be autologous, which utilizes a patient's own stem cells.

Importance of Bone Marrow

Bone marrow is the soft tissue found in the centre of bones. It is here that new blood cells are formed; stem cells are considered the parent cells of these blood cells. Stem cells in the marrow have the vital task of creating a person's three blood cell types. These are:
  • Red blood cells: transport oxygen
  • White blood cells: fight disease
  • Platelets: aid in clotting after injury

Bone marrow stem cells are found in bone marrow and in a person's blood. After stem cells multiply, they form immature blood cells, which are then subject to a collection of changes that allow them to develop into mature blood cells. Once mature, the blood cells migrate from the marrow and are introduced into the bloodstream, where they provide important functions in keeping the body alive and healthy.

Effects Of Chemotherapy On Bone Marrow

Because chemotherapy operates by destroying the fast growing cancer cells, higher levels are generally more effective for killing cancer cells. Similar to cancer cells, however, bone marrow cells grow quickly and are also very sensitive to chemotherapy treatment. The chemotherapy can eventually destroy the marrow completely, which then prevents new and healthy blood cells from developing.

Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Harvest

In an autologous transplant, a patient's own stem cells are used. The problem here is that the patient’s bone marrow and peripheral blood usually have a lot of cancer cells, so isolating stem cells can't generally occur until the patient is in remission.

A patient will usually receive some chemotherapy to reduce cancer cells before stem cells are collected. The harvested stem cells are also treated to ensure that no cancer cells remain. Higher doses of chemotherapy are then given, sometimes alongside complete body radiation, to confirm that no cancer remains. Stem cells are then transplanted back into the body via a rapid injection. Stem cells will eventually migrate to the bone marrow, where they latch onto other cells there and develop into the different blood cells.

Allogeneic Bone Marrow Stem Cell Harvest

In the allogeneic transplant, a suitable donor is used; this may be a family member or a person unrelated to the patient. Similar to the autologous bone marrow stem cell harvest, a patient receives high doses of chemotherapy and possibly also radiation therapy. This therapy will destroy the patient's marrow and immune system, so that the patient's immune system can't attack the transplanted cells that are received from the donor. Graft rejection is a very real concern for allogeneic transplants, where the recipient's immune system recognizes the transplanted cells as 'foreign' and launches an immune attack. Prior to the transplant, red blood cells in the stem cell sample are usually identified and discarded and particularly so if the donor's blood group is different from that of the patient.

Stem cells are then infused into the patient via an intravenous line over several hours. Stem cells travel to the patient's bone marrow where they develop and produce the blood cells necessary for blood functioning. Patients may also still be given drug therapy for some time to reduce the chances of immune rejection.

Bone marrow stem cell harvests are clearly a life saving technique for those suffering from certain cancers such as leukaemia. They are one of the 'older' stem cell therapies and have been proven effective for decades now. There are, however, still issues of rejection that warrant further development and refinement of stem cell harvesting techniques. It is hoped that scientists will continue to focus on research to improve the odds of success for this important treatment.

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Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
@JenN - I'm afraid we cannot answer that as we don't have such information. You would have to speak directly with her consultant.
ExploreStemCells - 14-May-15 @ 3:04 PM
My sister has Choriocarcinoma and has received Chemotherapy for a full year now. Her hcg count started at over 450 thousand, went down to 6 and is now going up again and is on 9. They have had to lower her chemo by 20% because of the damage it is going to her body and she is currently on a chemo rest because of this. Her Oncologists have decided to do a stem cell harvest within the next three weeks. Could I aid in giving her an allogeneic harvest rather than an autologous one? What would I have to do? How long would I be out of action for because my mom is looking after my sisters three children and I also have three. Please help! Many thanks. ??
JenN - 13-May-15 @ 7:52 AM
Please,I want to know what is the reasons of the expensive of the process that treatment diabetes with stem cells
Sohaila Reda - 9-Aug-14 @ 5:06 PM
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